All-Bond Universal

Author : Julie Cullen
Published Date 02/24/2014
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Superior Bond Strength in an Adhesive that Is Truly Universal

Jack D. Griffin Jr, DMD

Since 1988, Dr. Jack D. Griffin has practice at Eureka Smile Center, a comprehensive general practice in suburban St. Louis. He graduated from Southern Illinois University Dental School and completed a general dentistry residency at the University of Louisville with an emphasis in advanced dental care in restorative dentistry, emergency care, implants, oral surgery, and special patient care. A frequent lecturer and author, Dr. Griffin is a diplomate of the American Board of Aesthetic Dentistry, accredited with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, and has earned a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

With any dentin bonding agent, clinicians are looking for high long-term bond strengths, patient comfort, and ease of use. Since 2012, "universal" bonding agents have been gaining popularity. BISCO's ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL has been our favorite in this category because of its low film thickness, clear color, versatility, simplicity, and superior bond strengths, whether direct or indirect. Additionally, the HEMA and water content are minimized, resulting in a decrease in water sorption and permeability, leading to longer lasting, more durable bonds.

Universal Defined

Regardless of the etch technique used (no-etch, total-etch, or selective-etch), ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL excels. Likewise, its clinical performance with both direct and indirect restorations decreases the need for any other bonding system in the office, reducing inventory while increasing efficiency. It is a truly comprehensive bonding system in a single bottle.

Etching Options

Many dentists are apprehensive about total etching of the dentin because of potential pulpal irritation from unsealed dentinal tubules or the physical pain-causing irritation from phosphoric acid itself. Therefore a "non-etch" approach to dentin bonding is often used. For direct composite restorations, the "selective-etch" technique combines the best bonding to both tooth layers. Highest long-term bond strengths to enamel are gained after phosphoric acid etching, yet high long-term dentin bonding with lower sensitivity is achieved from a non-etch technique. ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL is ideal to use with this technique.

Simple Technique Versatility

Selective etching involves a 10 to 15 second etch of the enamel, thorough rinsing, moist dentin, and bonding agent application. Universal bonding systems ensure high bond strengths to enamel and dentin whether the smear layer was left intact without etching or if the smear layer was removed by intentional or unintentional phosphoric acid application. These materials show outstanding bond strengths regardless of bonding method.

I have found Class 5 root surface abfraction composites to be predictable using ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL with this technique. I bevel the enamel lightly with a finishing diamond, lightly sandblast the dentin with aluminum oxide, and etch the enamel with 37% phosphoric acid for 10 seconds. After rinsing, the root surface dentin is left moist. I place several layers of ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL on the surface, air dry, and light cure for 10 seconds. I then cover the root surface with a flowable composite, cure, and finish. Because of its low film thickness and high bond strengths to non-etched dentin, ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL is great for cementing indirects such as lithium disilicate or zirconia. After isolation and dentin cleaning, I agitate several coats of ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL onto the dentin, air dry until no movement occurs, and light cure for 10 to 15 seconds. The restoration is then placed with the dual-cure resin cement. The film thickness under 10 microns allows complete seating of these restorations with a maximum in retention.

In an adhesion world that is often confusing, universal bonding agents provide bonding simplicity. Because of its versatility, tolerance, and performance, ALL-BOND UNIVERSAL has become the goto bonding system in our office

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