Opalescence PF Take-Home System

Author : Dental Product Shopper
Published Date 06/01/2012
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Opalescence PF Take-Home System

Opalescence PF combines whitening, remineralization, and protection in a single formula.

In 1990, Ultradent’s Opalescence take-home tooth whitening moved up to the next generation with the introduction of Opalescence PF. Based on the popular and proven Opalescence carbamide peroxide formulation, Opalescence PF adds potassium nitrate and fluoride to most of the formulations for enamel strengthening, sensitivity reduction, and caries prevention—3 characteristics not typically associated with tooth whitening.

Flexibility

Further building on Opalescence’s effectiveness, Opalescence PF offers 4 strengths for flexible treatment. It is available in 10%, 15%, 20%, and 35% concentrations. Patients who can tolerate the higher concentrations achieve whitening quickly (the 35% strength is recommended for 30-minute, once daily wear, with results in 5 to 10 days), while patients with sensitivities can achieve the same whitening results with the lower concentrations and longer wear times.

Additionally, 3 flavors—melon, mint, and regular—give patients an additional choice, which promotes compliance.

Patient and Practice Benefits

Adding to its attributes, Opalescence PF has a near-neutral pH of 6.5, eliminating the risk of demineralization during treatment. A 20% water content prevents dehydration and shade relapse. In addition, its high viscosity, sticky gel resists leaching from the custom-formed tray.

Indications for Opalescence PF include lightening of discolored teeth caused by a variety of congenital, systemic, metabolic, pharmacologic, traumatic, or iatrogenic factors. It is also effective on nonvital teeth for intracoronal bleaching.

“Opalescence is so viscous, it stays in the tray even overnight,” noted Dr. Jaimee Morgan, who practices orthodontics and cosmetic dentistry in Salt Lake City, UT. “And because Opalescence provides 8 to 10 hours of active bleaching, I know my patients are getting the best bang for their efforts, while I am getting the best bang for my buck.”

Backed by Science

Efficacy of the “PF” in Opalescence PF has been tested in numerous clinical studies.1,2,3 These studies support Ultradent’s claim that the PF formula remineralizes for overall enamel health and microhardness, minimizes sensitivity, and reduces caries risk. Additionally, 2 Indiana University School of Dentistry studies showed that the Opalescence PF gel stays active for 8 to 10 hours during overnight whitening. 4, 5

A Convenient Alternative

Ultradent offers several alternatives under the Opalescence brand. It offers a hydrogen peroxide option in 6%, 10%, and 15% concentrations in its Opalescence Go. Opalescence Go offers the convenience of pre-filled disposable trays, without the need for impressions, molds, or laboratory time. The discreet, clear trays adapt to any smile; they are worn from 15 minutes to an hour per day for results in 5 to 10 days.

Another option is Opalescence Boost, an in-office jump-start for at-home whitening. The activated 40% hydrogen peroxide is conveniently delivered in a syringe and applied to teeth for whitening. Opalescence Boost is chemically activated, so it does not require light. Syringe-to-syringe mixing activates the product just prior to application. These are a few of the many convenient options that Ultradent offers its users.

References

1. Clark LM et al. Influence of Fluoridated Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel Demineralization. (AADR Abstract #0497), 2006.

2. Amaechi BT et al. Enamel Fluoride Uptake from Fluoridated Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel. (AADR Abstract #0498), 2006.

3. Browning WD et al. Report of Low Sensitivity Whiteners (AADR Abstract #1650), 2006.

4. Matis BA, Yousef M, Cochran MA, et al. Degradation of bleaching gels in vivo as a function of tray design and carbamide peroxide concentration. Oper Dent. 2002;27(1):12-8.

5. Matis BA, Gaiao U, Blackman D, et al. In vivo degradation of bleaching gel used in whitening teeth. J Am Dent Assoc. 1999;130(2):227-35.

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