Handpieces

SUB-CATEGORIES
High-Speed Handpieces (air-driven)(95)
Low-Speed Handpieces (air-driven)(50)
Electric Handpieces(58)
Air-Driven Handpieces(53)
Handpiece Accessories(178)
Prophy Handpieces(11)
MANUFACTURER
A Dec Inc
Adec
AG Neovo
Aseptico, Inc.
Beyes Dental Canada, Inc
Bien Air Usa, Inc.
Brasseler Usa
DentalEZ
Dentsply Sirona
Henry Schein
J. Morita Usa
Johnson-Promident
Kavo Kerr Group
Lares Dental Research
Medidenta
Mtc America Enterprises Inc.
MTI Dental Products
Palisades Dental, Llc
Prodrive Systems, Inc.
Ritter Dental
Sabra Dental Products
Salvin Dental Specialties, Inc.
Sybronendo Corporation
Zest Dental Solutions
Autoclavable
Yes
Light
No
Yes
Torque
20Watts-25Watts
Warranty
1 Year
2 Year
USER RATINGS
EVALUATED

Air-Driven Handpieces CATEGORY DESCRIPTION

Air-driven high-speed handpieces provide higher speeds but lower torque than electric handpieces. Power from air-driven handpieces is delivered to the bur via a turbine regulated by air less than 30 to 45 pounds per square inch. These handpieces generally operate at speeds between 250,000 rpm and 420,000 rpm (and decrease in speed when they meet resistance).

Depending upon the size of the head (mini-head, standard, and high-torque), air-driven handpieces provide 12 to 18 Watts of cutting power (torque). Mini-heads offer nearly 14 Watts of torque, and are ideal for pedodontic restorations, endodontic access, and treatment of second or third molars. Standard heads are considered effective overall handpieces, and are useful for crown and bridge preparation, and most other treatments performed in average practices. They provide 15 to 17 Watts of power, but need greater clearance than mini-heads, and tend to obscure more of the field. High-torque heads, with almost 18 Watts of torque, are indicated for tasks such as removing nonprecious crowns or heavy amounts of crown and bridge.

The 4-hole connector has been standard for air-driven handpieces, and manufacturers have now introduced quick-disconnect couplings to enable recommended autoclaving of the handpieces between patients.

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The Sabra 105 handpiece combines the advantages of large-head turbine technology with optimal access and visibility. Sabra Dental...
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Beyes Canada AirLight Dental HandpieceBeyes’ AirLight provides exceptionally bright direct LED illumination powered by a built-in...
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It is available with or without fiber-optics. Built for outstanding reliability with a compact, solid, sleek design, the handpiece is...
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J. Morita’s new TwinPower handpiece, the first with twin turbines, provides power, clinical stability, and constant speed. J. Morita's...
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Master Prophy AirLite is a lightweight handpiece designed to minimize hand fatigue and increase patient comfort.An evaluator with 21...
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The first products to be introduced in the line were the Gemini “Kavo Bella Torque-style” and Gemini “Kavo Super Torque-style”...
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Dual glass-rod optics virtually eliminate shadow. When used with the MX motor, the speed of the CA 1:5 L ranges from 500 RPM to 200,000...
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Model AHP-85MB-C includes an adjustable auto-stop kit (2 stops—short and long)—and a graduated ruler. The stops allow for precise depth...
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Ritter Dental introduces an expanded line of handpieces that feature air-driven, high speed, low speed, and fiber optic-equipped options...
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This LED handpiece with Penta Spray will serve the general dentist doing some endodontic work. The WD-79M has a unique gearing system...
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This micro head allows for greater visibility, and the push button allows for easy insertion or removal of the file. In addition, the...
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The AHP-63MBFO speed ranges from 1000 rpm to 40,000 rpm with most electric dental motors. The handpiece’s lower speed applications...

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  • Allison Walker

    As the end of the year draws closer, you may be taking stock of how the past 12 months went for your practice: what worked and what didn’t, what needs to be replaced or upgraded, and how you’re going to make 2017 even better from every angle, delivery of care to the bottom line. This is a good time to look at the condition of your equipment—do...

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  • Julie Cullen

    It’s probably a cliché, but I know that for me, one of the things I dislike most about going to the dentist is the noise of the handpieces (or, as the uninitiated might say, drills). My reaction is either instinctual or Pavlovian, I’m not sure which, but the sound sets my teeth on edge and ties my stomach into knots. And this from a layperson...

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  • Julie Cullen

    Admittedly, I may not be keeping up with my YouTube watching, but I did just come across a great video from NSK. It’s a comparison between their Ti-Max Z900L air-driven handpiece and an unnamed competitor’s. They did a great job with this demonstration both in terms of setting the experiment (same hardness of the test board, same type of bur,...

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  • Julie Schmitt

    Name: Nathan Vassiliades, DDS Dental School: Marquette University (Milwaukee, WI) Years in Practice: 4 Specialty: General Practitioner Practice Location: Queen Creek Smiles; Gilbert, AZ Favorite Dental Products: CEREC Omnicam with IPS e.max CAD There are myriad new dental products being thrown at dentists with promises of fixing x, y, and z....

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  • Allison Walker

    Have you ever thought about all the things we’ve stopped doing manually in our lifetimes? And we still have too much to do? It is absolutely true—there is just too much to do, and only so much one person can accomplish well in a day. Emphasis on well. We are all subject to the fact that while workloads increase, staff size usually doesn’t. This...

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  • Allison Walker

    Panoramic Corporation has an interesting history. The story begins with Dr. Robert Stetzel graduating from dental school in 1953. He started a private practice 4 years later, after serving in the US Marine Corps. Although he only encouraged them to develop a good work ethic, his two sons—Mark and Eric—followed in his footsteps, but taking...

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